The Adoration Scene: A Time-Honored Tradition

The lighting of the Adoration Nativity Scene—and the subsequent parade—is a time-honored Branson tradition and one of the highlights of the Christmas season in Branson.

The lighting of the Adoration Nativity Scene—and the subsequent parade—is a time-honored Branson tradition and one of the highlights of the Christmas season in Branson. Families and friends from all over gather downtown to watch

the lighting of the nativity scene and the Adoration Parade. The parade is held annually on the first Sunday in December, at dusk, following the lighting of the nativity.

It was 1949 when a businessman by the name of Joe Todd met with Steve Miller, a local artist, over the mid-day lunch break in a Downtown Branson café. There, the two men sketched their plans to construct an Adoration Nativity Scene to honor the Christ child—all on the face of a napkin. Six decades later, Branson continues to honor and celebrate their vision and hard work, displaying the traditional scene atop the same mountain where the original structure once stood.

Rebuilt in 2012, the 28-foot-tall nativity stands high above the Branson skyline, built to the same standards as the original scene based on photographs and the original plans. This year’s parade is scheduled for December 3 and features marching bands, floats from organizations in several states, and even an appearance from old Saint Nick himself. Although the original Adoration Nativity Scene is gone, the celebration of the Christmas story in a non-commercial manner along with the vision and dream of Joe Todd and Steve Miller still remain in Branson.